Posts Tagged ‘Nike running’

Nike LunarEpic Flyknit Running Shoes Review

Nike LunarEpic Flyknit First Impressions

Nike LunarEpic Flyknit

Updated 3/10/16

The Nike LunarEpic Flyknit will certainly turn heads. With its high-top bootie design, the running world hasn’t seen anything like these neutral, cushioned running shoes. Check out the full review on shoe hero.

The newest entry to Nike’s “Run Easy” category, the LunarEpic Flyknit shoes are meant for going long, running easy, or kicking it up with a progression run. In other words, this is a cushioned trainer designed with comfort in mind. The men’s size 10 weighs 8.3 oz and the women’s size 8 weighs 6.55 oz. Both have an 8.5 mm drop from heel to toe, with a retail price of $175.

I first tried the Nike LunarEpic Flyknit shoes, courtesy of Nike, during an interval workout with Nike trainers. I’ve since taken them on the road and trail. Here are my initial thoughts.

Nike LunarEpic Flyknit First Impressions

Testing the shoes, far left (Nike)

Nike LunarEpic Flyknit Design

If the Nike LunarEpic Flyknit embodies one buzzword, it’s “sensation.” Inspired by Nike soccer boots that earned great feedback from players, Nike Running’s design team set out to create a shoe the evoked a similar sensation. Namely, a sense of seamlessness from toe to ankle. Where does your body end and your shoe begin? The Nike LunarEpic Flyknit wants to erase that transition. Nike calls it a “virtually vanishing fit.” Is it? Yes and no.

Nike LunarEpic Flyknit First Impressions

Shoe or bootie?

Upper

The shoe’s upper is a single-piece of Nike Flyknit, featuring the material’s signature support, with a closer fit at the forefoot, arch, and heel, plus FlyWire cables to cinch the fit midfoot. The ankle collar, sewn more elastic than the boot, exists to anchor the shoe to your leg. The cuff might also eliminate some pressure points around the heel.

The laces? They may seem redundant, but actually help to perfect the fit, a Nike designer said at the shoe’s New York City launch I attended.

Nike LunarEpic Flyknit First Impressions

Rear view

Midsole

This is a glue-free shoe. Instead, Nike used heat to fuse the Lunarlon foam to the platform, thereby eliminating some weight and hardness. The platform itself is contoured, not flat, with laser-cut grooves on the side for flexibility. They collapse when you land, cushioning each foot strike.

Nike LunarEpic Flyknit First Impressions

Outsole

Outsole

The Lunarlon foam outsole is completely rubber-free, with laser-cut pads placed at high-pressure points. Each pad moves independently, depending on how your foot falls. How precisely? You can actually feather the grooves with your fingertips. Combined with the foam of the midsole, the outsole pads help make the ride smooth and soft.

Nike LunarEpic Flyknit First Impressions

Liking them so far (Nike)

Nike LunarEpic Flyknit Feel

I’ll start with this. I’m a huge fan of Nike Flyknit. I wore my Nike Flyknit Lunar 2 shoes ragged and Nike Free 4.0 are one of my go-to pairs.

At first look, these might be my favorite Nike shoes I’ve tried in the last two years, and I’ve worn the Nike Air Zoom Pegasus 32, Nike LunarTempo, Nike Flyknit Lunar 2, and two iterations each of Nike Free 3.0 Flyknit and Nike Free 4.0 Flyknit.

Nike LunarEpic Flyknit Review

Post-workout debrief (Nike)

Fit

This is a shoe you really need to try for yourself, simply because it is so different from anything you’ve put on your feet before. Certainly, some runners will hate the high ankle collar. Like the first iteration of the Nike Free 3.0 Flyknit, some folks will find it too tight or too constricting. Thankfully, Nike.com offers a 30-day trial period, during which you can return worn shoes, “dirt and all.”

I actually like the fit and the feel and the ankle bootie. If you surf or do triathlons, the ankle collar is more comfortable than the ankle strap of surf board leash, a triathlon timing chip band, or even a wetsuit cuff. When you first slip the shoes on your feet, the collar feels a little strange. But it’s incredibly stretchy and elastic. Once I got moving, I didn’t notice it all. I was too focused on the workout. Read the rest of this entry →

04

03 2016

Nike+ Run Club Offers Personal Pacers Via Uber

Nike+ Run Club Offers Personal Pacers Via Uber (Nike)

Running with my pacers (Nike)

In New York City for the world’s largest marathon on Sunday, November 1? Want to run like a pro with your own personal pacer? Now you can thanks to Nike+ Run Club and on-demand car-service Uber.

Instead of finding a ride with the Uber app, users can request a Nike+ Run Club pace team to lead them through a personalized on-demand jaunt around New York City for one day only: Saturday, October 31 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Best of all, it’s free!

Nike+ Run Club Offers Personal Pacers Via Uber (Nike)

Up a hill (Nike)

Nike+ Run Club sessions are 2-3 miles and tailored to your request. Pacers will also lead you through running-specific dynamic stretching, and gift you with some gear at the end of the run. Runs begin and end at your location, which must be between 72nd Street and 14th Street in Manhattan.

Nike+ Run Club Offers Personal Pacers Via Uber (Nike)

Running Midtown Manhattan (Nike)

Requesting a Nike+ Run Club pacer is exactly like requesting a car. I know, I had a chance to test out the service before it launches to the public. But instead of a car, two Nike+ Run Club pacers greet your on foot, with a race bib that looks like a license plate.

Nike+ Run Club Offers Personal Pacers Via Uber

My pacers! (Nike)

Once you open the Uber app and enter the promo code RUNNYC, you’ll see “NRC PACER” alongside your usual Uber choices like “uberT” and “uberX.” You’ll also see where NRC pacers are located near you with the Nike+ swoosh on the map. Read the rest of this entry →

30

10 2015

New Run Nike Women’s Series 15K Comes To Toronto

New Run Nike Women's Series 15K Comes To Toronto

Nike Women’s Half Marathon San Francisco (Photo: Nike)

UPDATE 3/9/15: Registration for the Nike Women’s 15K in Toronto is now open at Nike.com.

Big news in women’s running: Nike announced Tuesday that they’re expanding their Run Nike Women’s Series, which previously included half-marathons in San Francisco and Washington, D.C., to a 20 city tour around the world.

The new Nike Women’s Event Series will include the Nike Women’s Race Series and N+TC Tour with more than 200,000 participants. The series starts March 8, 2015 with the Nagoya Women’s Marathon and N+TC Tour Shanghai and culminates with the series signature event, the Nike Women’s Half Marathon San Francisco. New to North America will be the Nike Women’s 15K Toronto on June 14, 2015, in place of the Washington, D.C. half-marathon.

New Run Nike Women's Series Comes To Toronto

Shalane Flanagan, Joan Benoit Samuelson and Jordan Hasay at Nike Women’s Half Marathon San Francisco (Photo: Nike)

“We started over a decade ago with the inaugural Nike Women’s Marathon in San Francisco, and now the Nike Women’s Event Series is expanding that vision to bring the inspiration and camaraderie we find at local races and gyms to women all over the world,” said running legend and Olympic gold medalist Joan Benoit Samuelson in a statement.

“The Nike Women’s Race Series motivates women to achieve personal running goals, and N+TC Tour offers challenge, variety and reward for athletes at any level. The choices and access for women who love sport and fitness are better than ever with the announcement of the Nike Women’s Event Series.”

Nike Women’s Race Series

The expansion of the series will make it the world’s largest for women and will include distances ranging from 10K to half-marathon. Each event will be tailor made for its host city right down to a custom finisher necklace designed for each town. Cities in the tour will include: Read the rest of this entry →

22

01 2015

Gait Analysis For The Nike Women’s Half Marathon SF

Gait Analysis For Nike Women's Half Marathon San Francisco

(Courtesy of Nike)

Have you ever had a running gait analysis? I now have video of mine thanks to Nike Running.

On Sunday, October 19, I’ll be running the Nike Women’s Half Marathon in San Francisco! I’ll be attending the race courtesy of Nike as part of a media group. Along with the race, they’re helping me train and gear up for the event. Excited? You bet!

Gait Analysis

To help me gear up for the race, I got fit for shoes at the Nike Running store in New York City’s Flatiron district. I’ve had my gait analyzed four times before at various running stores and in physical therapy. I have it checked periodically in case my form has changed dramatically since I’ve gotten faster, been diagnosed with arthritis, injured my hip in a horseback riding fall, and all the other things that affect how I run.

But year after year, gait analysis shows I’m a steadfast neutral shoe runner. This time I have video proof.

But what does it mean to be a neutral shoe runner? Read the rest of this entry →

08

08 2014

Run Nike Women’s Half Marathon SF For Charity TNT

Run Nike Women's Half Marathon SF for charity with TNT

The Nike Women’s Half Marathon SF. (Photo: Nike)

So you didn’t get into the 2014 Nike Women’s Half Marathon SF? If you want to be one of the 25,000 runners at the start on October 19, you still can. Charity bibs are available with The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Team in Training (TNT), the series’ major beneficiary.

Run Nike Women's Hlaf Marathon SF for charity with TNT

A TNT runner. (Photo courtesy of Team in Training)

Since the first Nike Women’s Marathon in 2004, Team in Training participants have raised more than $147.9 million in Nike Women Series events, helping The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) fund research to advance lifesaving blood cancer treatments.

Through its 25th anniversary last year, TNT had trained more than 600,000 participants and raised more than $1.4 billion for LLS.

If you want to run the Nike Women’s Half Marathon SF with TNT, you’ll be asked to raise funds in exchange for your spot in the race. You’ll also train with TNT coaches for four months, receive access to clinics on nutrition and injury prevention, and race past San Francisco’s iconic sites.

Nike has yet to reveal the 2014 course. Previous editions started at Union Square in San Francisco and finished on the Great Highway at Ocean Beach, travelling along the San Francisco Bay with views of Alcatraz and the Golden Gate Bridge. Read the rest of this entry →

28

06 2014

Nike Free 3.0 Flyknit Running Shoes Review

Nike 3.0 Flyknit Running Shoes

The Nike 3.0 Flyknit shoe. (Photo: Nike)

Last week, I popped over to Niketown in New York City to try a pair of the new Nike Free 3.0 Flyknit running shoes. They’re an update to the Nike Free 3.0, a shoe that previously did not have a Flyknit upper. Nike gave me the shoes to keep and a spot in one of the Nike Free Stride treadmill sessions taking place at Niketown in New York City.

Nike Free 3.0 Flyknit running shoes

I’m warming up in the Nike Free 3.0 Flyknit shoes. (Photo: Nike)

The 32-minute Nike Free Stride workout focused on curating a more efficient and natural stride in the Nike Free 3.0 Flyknit shoes. A gentle warm-up and mini-stride clinic preceded a butt-kicking hill interval workout, as a DJ pumped throwback jams into the multi-story atrium of Niketown.

I’m not usually one for exercising on a stage while shoppers watch, but I was curious to try the shoes.

Nike had previously given me a pair of Nike Free Flyknit+ shoes, which came out in summer 2013. They were similar to the Nike Free 5.0, but with a Flyknit upper. I ended up not reviewing them and not including them in my Holiday Gift Guide for one simple reason: I didn’t love them.

I found them too tight around the ankle, to the point of being constrictive. Another runner I know even cut his Flyknits to reduce pressure on his Achilles tendon. While I like my shoes to fit well, I like my laces tied loosely. With no functional laces, the Flyknits are more like a supportive sock. With a tight top, they just weren’t the shoes for me.

Nike Free 3.0 Flyknit running shoes

That’s me giving the Nike Free 3.0 Flyknits a try. (Photo: Nike)

So I’m happy to report that the Nike Free 3.0 Flyknit running shoes have a much more comfortable fit in this newest version of the Flyknit upper.

Altogether, Nike made three major changes to the 2014 Nike Free 3.0 Flyknit from the previous versions of both the Free 3.0 and Free Flyknit. Read the rest of this entry →

15

04 2014

Nike Just Do It NYC ‘House of Innovation’ Is Running Art

Nike, Just Do It, House of Innovation

Nike’s Just Do It NYC: House of Innovation showcases their latest running technologies. (Photo: Nike)

Last night I had a chance to get a sneak peek at the Nike Just Do It NYC: House of Innovation, an art/commerce installation that showcases the brand’s new running gear for winter through video, lights, and sensory objects.

Nike Just Do It, Nike House of Innovation, Nike NYC, Nike running

The Nike Hyperwarm shirt floats in a sea of icicles. (Photo: RunKarlaRun.com)

The project is housed in New York’s Skylight at Moynihan Station, NYC’s historic James A. Farley Post Office turned event space. Guests walk into a completely blackened space, ushered through by Nike employees also glad in black. Lights are kept to a bare minimum—just enough to safely walk to the starting point of the installation.

From the pitch black of the warehouse-like space, a video on two screens straddling a walkway begins the presentation. When the video ends, lights rise on the first part of the exhibit: a collection of shoe forms and Nike Free Flyknit shoes hanging from the ceiling.

We’re encouraged to touch and walk through them before proceeding to the next stop on the tour, a similar presentation of Nike’s Pro Hyperwarm Hybrid shirt surrounded by field of floating icicles. Read the rest of this entry →

27

09 2013

Product Watch: Nike+ SportWatch GPS with TomTom

nike+ sportwatch gpsIt’s what Nike+ users have been waiting for—a Nike+ watch with GPS. Powered by TomTom, the new Nike+ SportWatch GPS is sure to give Garmin and the other wrist bots an, ahem, run for their money.

Nike is rolling out the red carpet for their newest Nike+ product. The watch uses both the familiar Nike+ shoe sensor and TomTom’s GPS technology to track runs. Users can then upload their runs to Nikeplus.com via a built-in USB connector in the watch’s strap. New features on Nikeplus.com will map and track runs, including time, pace, distance, calories burned, heart rate and elevation.

The watch will even serve as your Jiminy Cricket if you need one; automatic reminders magically appear when you haven’t logged a run for five days. Read the rest of this entry →

06

01 2011

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